filed under Her Mother's Secret, How To Write A Book.

On Facebook last week, I saw someone asking the question: how do you define success as a writer? It came on the back of a Twitter update, from someone attending a writing seminar, where UWA Press publisher Terri-Ann White said that the average sales of a book in Australia were just 800 copies per year. Does that then mean if you sell 800 copies in one year you’re a success? 800 copies might earn an author just over $2,000—for something that’s taken about 5 years of their life to write. Maybe for some that is success. For others, perhaps not.…

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filed under Author Interviews.

I’m so thrilled to have Kate Forsyth here today for Where Stories Are Made, where I take you behind the scenes into a writer’s writing space. Kate Forsyth is one of my favourite authors of historical fiction and I’m so looking forward to reading her new book, Beauty in Thorns. Over to Kate, to tell you all about the places where she dreams up her wonderful stories! 1. My stories are made … I can write anywhere, but I have two favourite places. The first is in bed, first thing in the morning, when I write in my diary. I…

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filed under How To Write A Book, The French Photographer, The Paris Seamstress.

Incubation is a greatly underrated but hugely important part of the writing process, of how an idea becomes a book. Everyone talks about the actual writing and the redrafting and the editing but few people talk about the thinking time. I guess that’s because it’s hard to talk about: blogging about time spent doing nothing other than thinking could quickly turn into a very dull post! But I’m going to give it a go because it’s been on my mind a lot lately as I incubate an idea that will hopefully become a book for 2020 (crazy far away I…

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filed under How To Write A Book, The French Photographer, The Paris Seamstress.

During the week, I posted a picture on my Facebook page of a chart I like to do at the end of my second draft. It helps me see where the gaps are and what I need to work on in the next redraft. Unexpectedly, the picture attracted a flood of comments and requests for me to blog about how I use the chart and what I do when I’m redrafting a novel. So, here goes! The Second Draft I’ve blogged before about how my first drafts are a bit of a mess; I don’t print out my first draft,…

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filed under Author Interviews.

As soon as I thought of the idea for this blog series, I knew I’d have to have Kirsty Manning as my guest. Her writing outlook is spectacular, and definitely worth sharing. She’s also offered a signed copy of her new book, The Midsummer Garden, to one lucky person who comments on this blog post. So sit back and enjoy this tour of Kirsty Manning’s writing spaces! 1. My stories are made … At home, mostly. I have a home office that has French doors on a deck high among my chestnut trees. It feels a little like writing in…

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filed under How To Write A Book.

The one question I’ve been asked by readers at every event over the last two months has been about my writing routine. I know I’ve blogged about it before, but probably not for a couple of years, and I’ve just realised I have lots of new readers who haven’t read my previous posts on the subject. So, given the number of questions I’ve been asked about it lately, I’m going to shed some light on my writing routine. The 4 Parts of My Day My day basically falls into 4 parts. Part 1: 6am-8am, which is before the kids go…

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filed under Her Mother's Secret, How To Write A Book.

Last year I wrote a post about deleted scenes in A Kiss from Mr Fitzgerald. I got so much feedback about it that I’ve decided to write a post about the deleted scenes in Her Mother’s Secret. Apparently writers don’t often share their deleted scenes but I think it’s really important to understand that nobody begins with the perfect novel; a first draft is an exploration of what the story is and, to truly explore, you have to be prepared to try some things that don’t work. Which is why I’ve decided to open up my Trash in Scrivener and pull…

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filed under Book Reviews.

It’s time to talk about books! Book Chat, my reading round up, is back with some must-reads and some other books I wasn’t so keen on. As usual, you can get my reading recommendations on the video below, or scroll further down for a quick summary. I’m reviewing Lauren Sams’ Crazy, Busy, Guilty, Joy Callaway’s The Fifth Avenue Artist’s Society, Liane Moriarty’s The Hypnotist’s Love Story and a title that isn’t out yet, Sophie Green’s The Inaugural Meeting of the Fairvale Ladies Book Club, which is my pick of the month.   Crazy, Busy, Guilty by Lauren Sams This book made me realise just…

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filed under Author Interviews.

Welcome back to Where Stories Are Made, my monthly feature where I interview another author and ask them to take us behind the scenes into their writing space. I’m very excited that bestselling author Rachael Johns is my guest this month. I hope you enjoy this peek at her writing cabin, plus there’s a chance to win a copy of her latest book! Over to you, Rachael. 1. My stories are made … My stories are (mostly) made in my brand new writer’s cabin (although you wouldn’t be able to tell it’s new if you saw how much clutter I’ve…

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filed under How To Write A Book.

The best things about being a writer are obviously the fame, the fortune, and the glamour, right? Well, I haven’t been lucky enough to find any of those things but here I am, still writing. And despite not having those things, I still think I’m lucky anyway. Teaching a couple of courses to aspiring writers over the weekend reminded me of this so I thought it might be good to share with you what exactly it is that I love about writing. We so often hear stories of how hard writing a book is; maybe it is hard sometimes but there…

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