filed under Author Interviews.

I’m so thrilled to have Kate Forsyth here today for Where Stories Are Made, where I take you behind the scenes into a writer’s writing space. Kate Forsyth is one of my favourite authors of historical fiction and I’m so looking forward to reading her new book, Beauty in Thorns. Over to Kate, to tell you all about the places where she dreams up her wonderful stories! 1. My stories are made … I can write anywhere, but I have two favourite places. The first is in bed, first thing in the morning, when I write in my diary. I…

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filed under Book Reviews.

I’ve been binge-reading historical novels and they’ve all been fabulous! This month, for Book Chat, I’ve read and reviewed The Beast’s Garden by Kate Forsyth, Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Anne Fowler, The Other Side of the World by Stephanie Bishop, and The Tide Watchers by Lisa Chaplin. I also dove into some non-fiction with Gretchen Rubin’s The Happiness Project. You can find comprehensive reviews of each book in the video, or scroll down further for a quick snapshot review. The Beast’s Garden by Kate Forsyth Beauty and the Beast retold as a harrowing love story set…

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filed under Author Interviews, How To Write A Book.

I’m so excited to have Kate Forsyth on the blog today! I interviewed Kate all about her latest book, The Beast’s Garden, which is out now. I’m loving the book, and will review it properly in Book Chat later this month, but, for now, sit back, relax and enjoy finding out more about Kate Forsyth and The Beast’s Garden. 1. The Beast’s Garden is a retelling of the Grimms’ fairytale, The Singing, Springing Lark, which is a version of Beauty and the Beast. Why did you want to re-tell the Beauty and the Beast story—what is it about that story…

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filed under How To Write A Book, Writing Historical Fiction.

Two weekends ago, I headed off to Sydney to attend the inaugural Historical Novels Society of Australasia’s Conference and I’m so glad I did. What a fabulous conference! There were so many great discussions about reading and writing historical fiction and I’m going to do my best to distil the wisdom here for you. Colin Falconer’s opening address was inspiring and I especially loved what he had to say about why we are drawn to historical fiction: “the past tells us more about ourselves and the future than speculative fiction. Because things that have happened in the past will, without…

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filed under Book Reviews.

It’s been a month of historical fiction—I’ve been lost in the worlds of Kate Forsyth’s Bitter Greens, Sue Monk Kidd’s The Invention of Wings, Kim Kelly’s The Blue Mile and, because I spent a couple of days in bed with a lurgy, I squeezed in an extra book, Evergreen Falls by Kimberley Freeman. One of these books was not at all what I was expecting but, regardless, I loved it. Another made me wonder how much responsibility the author has, when writing a novel about a real person, to stick to the known facts. Inventing plausible stories in the spaces between the…

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filed under How To Write A Book, Writing and Motherhood.

I’m so excited to be talking to Kate Forsyth today about how to make time to write a book. Most of you probably know that Kate has been a successful writer for years. She’s published books for children, books for adults, works of fantasy, historical fiction; she’s truly a diverse and well loved writer. I first saw Kate speak at the Australian Society of Authors National Congress last year and I was so inspired by her speech that I went straight out and bought her book, The Wild Girl, which I reviewed glowingly on Book Chat earlier this year. So,…

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filed under How To Write A Book.

Hurray! It’s Book Chat time. I have to say, this is one of my favourite things to do on my blog—who wouldn’t love chatting about books for ten minutes? My apologies for this month’s Book Chat being a couple of weeks later than it should have been. The launch of the new website delayed things a little. But, without further ado in the video below, I’ll answer the question everybody is asking: is The Luminaries worth the time it takes to read it? I’ll also tell you if I agree with dual Book Prize winner Hilary Mantel, who says that…

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